Iraq war: 10 years on

Posted on March 25, 2013

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It is now ten years since the Second Gulf War began. During recent days I have seen several programs on BBC World News that have taken up various aspects of the war. The Guardian has a series of articles collected under the headline ”Iraq war: 10 years on“. What amazes me is that none of the articles discuss the connection of the war to the oil in Iraq.

In contrast, if one visits CNN this connection is mentioned and the following headline gives the message clearly: ”Why the war in Iraq was fought for Big Oil”.

“Yes, the Iraq War was a war for oil, and it was a war with winners: Big Oil. It has been 10 years since Operation Iraqi Freedom’s bombs first landed in Baghdad. And while most of the U.S.-led coalition forces have long since gone, Western oil companies are only getting started.

Before the 2003 invasion, Iraq’s domestic oil industry was fully nationalized and closed to Western oil companies. A decade of war later, it is largely privatized and utterly dominated by foreign firms.

From ExxonMobil and Chevron to BP and Shell, the West’s largest oil companies have set up shop in Iraq. So have a slew of American oil service companies, including Halliburton, the Texas-based firm Dick Cheney ran before becoming George W. Bush’s running mate in 2000.”

There is much more to read at CNN’s homepage on the connection between oil and the war. It remains to be seen how high the rate of oil production from Iraq will become and the IEA expresses great hopes for this in their 2012 World Energy Outlook report.

Today the BBC showed a program that followed a father who had lost his son in the war. They followed him to Iraq as he tried to find something to make the loss of his son meaningful. He met a number of people in Basra. They were grateful that Saddam Hussein was gone but there were also critical voices. The cost in lives was great. The father tried to find anything that would give meaning to the loss of his son but I think that, in the end, he thought that the price was too high.

I agree with CNN, it is seems a little strange that the large international oil companies can now go in and earn huge profits as a result of the war in Iraq.

(Swedish)
Det är nu 10 år sedan det andra Irakkriget började och under de senaste dagarna har jag sett flera program på BBC World News som har tagit upp olika aspekter av kriget. The Guardian har en serie av artiklar som man sammanställer under rubriken ”Iraq war: 10 years on“. Vad som förvånar mig är att ingen av artiklarna diskuterar kriget och kopplingen till oljan i Irak.

Om man däremot går till CNN kan man hitta kopplingen mellan kriget och oljan och följande rubrik ger ett tydligt budskap: ”Why the war in Iraq was fought for Big Oil”.

“Yes, the Iraq War was a war for oil, and it was a war with winners: Big Oil. It has been 10 years since Operation Iraqi Freedom’s bombs first landed in Baghdad. And while most of the U.S.-led coalition forces have long since gone, Western oil companies are only getting started.

Before the 2003 invasion, Iraq’s domestic oil industry was fully nationalized and closed to Western oil companies. A decade of war later, it is largely privatized and utterly dominated by foreign firms.

From ExxonMobil and Chevron to BP and Shell, the West’s largest oil companies have set up shop in Iraq. So have a slew of American oil service companies, including Halliburton, the Texas-based firm Dick Cheney ran before becoming George W. Bush’s running mate in 2000.”

Det finns mycket mer att läsa på CNN:s hemsida om kopplingen olja och kriget. Nu återstår det att se hur stor produktionen kommer att bli och i World Energy Outlook 2012 har IEA stora förhoppningar.

Idag hade BBC ett program där vi fick följa en far som förlorade sin son i kriget. Man fick följa honom då han åkte till Irak för att försöka hitta något som gjorde att han kunde se det som miningsfullt att förlora en son. Han fick träffa olika personer i Basra. Man var tacksamma för att Saddam Hussein var borta, men det fanns också kritiska röster. Priset i antalet döda är stort. Pappan försökte som sagt finna några halmstrån som kunde motivera priset att förlora en son, men jag tror att han till slut tyckte att priset var för högt.

Jag håller med CNN, det känns lite konstigt att de stora internationella oljebolagen nu kan gå in och känna stora pengar på Irakkriget.

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