The Economist: ”Oil is yesterday’s fuel”

Posted on August 1, 2013

12


The_Economist_3rd Aug

The next issue of The Economist has a front cover that says, “The future of oil – Yesterday’s fuel”. 14 years ago, on 4 March 1999, the front cover had a completely different message. Then, the editors of the Economist published an article titled, “Drowning in Oil”. They wrote that “The world is awash with the stuff, and it is likely to remain so”. They thought that cheap oil from the Middle East would reduce the then price of $10 down to $5 per barrel.

One year earlier Colin Campbell and Jean Laherrere wrote in an article in Scientific American that cheap oil would reach peak production in around 2004 (read the article). It was the flow of this cheap oil that, according to The Economist, would force the price down to $5 per barrel. We now know that, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA) cheap oil reached maximal production in 2005 and the shortage of cheap oil subsequently forced the price up to over $100 per barrel.

Fig 3-2 oil formation 1000

On the 3rd of August 2013 the next issue of The Economist will have a front cover showing a dinosaur holding a dripping fuel bowser nozzle. It is interesting that the Economist should choose this image since in my book, ”Peeking at Peak Oil” we describe how the greatest amount of oil was formed during the same period that the dinosaurs roamed the Earth.

Peak Oil Dino

When we began writing the book we also had a dinosaur to symbolize “Peak Oil” and the image on the front cover of The Economist gives me reason to show you this depiction.

The Economist does not believe that a shortage of oil is causing the stalling of production growth. “This is not the “peak oil” widely discussed several years ago, when several theorists, who have since gone strangely quiet, reckoned that supply would flatten and then fall.” The reason why The Economist believes that that we in ASPO, The Association for the Study of Peak Oil and Gas, are silent is because leading newspapers such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, The Guardian and The Times no longer accept our articles for publication. We have no wealthy oil companies to back us. Instead, what we have seen in the past half year is that everything in the press has focussed on how “fracking” will solve all our problems. Personally, last year I published “Peaking at Peak Oil” and I encourage the editorial staff of The Economist to read it as a counterweight to all those articles that say we have nothing to worry about.

Fig 18-3 oil production and export_import

The Economist’s comment, “in the rich world oil demand has already peaked: it has fallen since 2005” is interesting and should be explained. Figure 19.3 in my book shows that the volume of oil available for export reached a maximum (i.e. a peak) in 2005. Since then the world’s wealthier nations have seen consumption (or “demand”) fall. The fact that the oil price rose from $10 per barrel in 1999 to over $100 today should give every faithful economist reason to believe that we are now experiencing an oil shortage.

It is my hope that the article in The Economist will reactivate the Peak Oil debate.

(Swedish below)

Nästa nummer av The Economist har en framsida som säger: The future of oil – Yesterday’s fuel (artikeln). För 14 år sedan, den 4:de mars 1999, hade framsidan ett helt annat budskap då ledarredaktionen för The Economist publicerade ett inlägg med rubriken ”Drowning in oil”. Man skrev att ”The world is awash with the stuff, and it is likely to remain so”. Man trodde att den billiga oljan från Mellanöstern skulle kunna flöda så att priset som då var $10 per fat kunde sjunka till $5 per fat. (Här är en länk till artikeln för intresserade läsare.)

Ett år tidigare hade Colin Campbell och Jean Leherrere i en artikel i Scientific America skrivit att den billiga oljan skulle nå maximal produktion runt 2004 (läs artikel). Det var flödet av denna billiga olja som enligt The Economist skulle pressa ner priset till $5 per fat. Vi vet nu enligt International Energy Agency, IEA, att den billiga oljan nådde maximal produktion 2005 och att bristen på billig olja pressade upp priset till över $100 per fat.

Fig 3-2 oil formation 1000
Den 3: je augusti 2013 kommer nästa nummer av The Economist att ha en framsida där en dinosaurie håller i en droppande slang från en bensinpump. Det är intressant att The Economist väljer att ha en dinosaurie som håller i bensinslangen för i min bok ”Peeking at Peak Oil” visar vi att den största mängden olja blidades just då dinosaurierna vandrase runt här på jorden.

Peak Oil Dino
Då vi började skriva boken hade vi också en dinosaurie som markerade ”Peak Oil” och bilden från förstasidan på The Economist ger mig nu möjlighet att också visa denna bild. Årtalen 2009 till 2013 kommer från Colins och min artikel om Peak Oil från 2003.

The Economist tror inte att det är brist på olja som orsakar en produktionstopp: “This is not the “peak oil” widely discussed several years ago, when several theorists, who have since gone strangely quiet, reckoned that supply would flatten and then fall.” Anledningen till att The Economist tycker att vi inom ASPO, the Association for the Study of Peak Oil and Gas, är tysta beror på det faktum att ledande tidningar som Wall Street Journal, New York Times, The Guardians och The Times inte accepterar de artiklar som vi skriver. Vi har inga rika oljebolag som backar upp oss. Vad vi sett det senaste halvåret är att all som skriver att ”fracking” skall lösa alla problem har fått stort utrymme i pressen. Personligen publicerade jag förra året boken ”Peeking at Peak Oil” och jag rekommenderar nu ledarredaktionen för The Economist att läsa den som en motvikt till alla de artiklar som säger att vi inte behöver oroa oss.

Fig 18-3 oil production and export_import
Kommentaren ”in the rich world oil demand has already peaked: it has fallen since 2005” är intressant och kan förklaras. Figur 19.3 i min bok visar att den volym olja som är tillgänglig för export nådde ett maximum 2005 och då det är den rika världen som importerar olja är konsekvensen att konsumtionen eller “demand” minskar i den rika världen. Det faktum att priset på olja ökade från $10 per fat 1999 till över $100 per fat borde få varje rättrogen ekonom att förstå att vi nu har en brist på olja.

Det är nu min förhoppning att artikeln i The Economist skall aktivera Peak Oil debatten.

Posted in: Uncategorized