Russian Energy Outlook To 2040

Posted on June 13, 2014

1


Russian Outlook

Yesterday I received mail from Tatiana Mitrova, Head of Oil and Gas Department, Energy Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. She told that Russia had now released its “Global and Russian Energy Outlook To 2040”, and that it included a detailed study of the Russian energy sector. She concluded her mail with “Your comments and feedback would be highly appreciated!”

Global Energy Systems (GES) at Uppsala University has studied Russian oil production in a master thesis and Russian coal and gas production in separate articles published in 2010. The coal and gas articles were included in Michael Höök’s och Bengt Söderbergh’s doctoral theses respectively. It will be very interesting to review the Russian report and, of course, I will write a report on that. I have taken a couple of hours to browse through the 173 long page Energy Outlook to 2040 report and below are some short notes.

Kinas kolproduktion

That our research is included in the Russian analysis can be seen in, among other things, Table 2.2 that shows coal production in China. In our analysis from 2010 we found that Peak Coal in China will occur between 2020 and 2025 at a maximal production level of 3.3 billion tons per year. I collaboration with researchers from China, GES made a much more detailed analysis presented in 2013. That analysis predicted a peak year of 2024 at a production rate of 4.1 billion tons per year. As you can see, this is now also China’s official understanding.

Global GDP per region

In the introduction to the report there is a detailed analysis of global population growth and global and regional economic growth per person. Note the strong Chinese growth but also the strong growth in Russia. Globally, one has never seen economic growth without increased energy use and energy use per person is increasing in China and Russia. With respect to the USA and the rest of the OECD, including the EU, strong growth is also expected without an increase in energy consumption per inhabitant. These are interesting conclusions that require more detailed study.

Global energy per person and per region

Global primary energy consumption

In Figure A1 they show how the profile of use of different forms of energy is expected to change in the period to 2040. Like other analyses, only increases are expected in the use of all types of energy. There is no detailed description of how they arrived at these values but there is discussion of which parts of the world will have increased energy consumption and which parts will show increased production.

Oil production in Russia

For me the analysis of Russia’s production is of most interest so I now jump to the end of the report. In Figure 3.24 it is interesting to note that the world’s leading energy exporting nations now report that their oil production is expected to reach a maximum in 2015. This agrees well with the analysis we made in 2007 and that is discussed in Peeking at Peak Oil. We said that 2016 is the most likely year for maximal Russian oil production.

Table oil export

For us in Sweden who import more than 40% of our oil from Russia it is especially interesting to study Russia’s expected future oil exports. In 2010 they exported 248 million tons and as early as 2015 a decline to 240 million tonnes is expected. Exports to Europe are expected to decline by all of 12%. In 2040 exports are expected to be 187 million tons and compared with 2010, exports to Europe will decline from 182 million tons to 83 million tonnes which is a reduction by 54%. At the same time, exports to the Asia-Pacific region will grow. One reason for this is that the oil that is marked as “from new discovered” is from oilfields in the Asian part of Russia. Russian domestic consumption must, primarily, be taken from the old oilfields that also produce oil for export to Europe. I do not believe that politicians are aware of this threat to European energy security.

Russia pipeline system

When one studies the Russian pipeline system one sees how import are exports through St. Petersburg. Sweden should obtain a long term import contract with Russia to secure our oil imports. To believe that we will not need gasoline, aviation fuel and diesel in our future is not realistic.

Gas production in Russia

In our article from 2010 we showed the decline in gas production in Russia’s existing fields. Some of this is gas that is currently exported to the EU. In Figure 3.30 below, production is divided up into different regions. New production is from the “Far East” and “Eastern Siberia” and that production will not come to the EU. Tyumen lies in southwest Siberia and that gas will be exported to China. Gas from “Northern Seas” is mainly from Stockman and Yamal has to be discussed in its own chapter.

Gas production in Russia by region

LNG terminals

A notable aspect is the strong growth in LNG terminals and in Figure 3.33 one sees 5 new terminals plus that one already existing on Sakhalin. The fact that LNG allows a greater freedom of choice of nations to export to should give politicians within the EU pause for thought.

Regarding gas exports, the report describes that these will grow from 223 bcm per year in 2010 to 310 bcm per year in 2040 and they state that their gas production will cover Europe’s needs. Exports to the east will grow from the current 6% to 30% of exports in 2040.

EU-28 primary energy consumption

In some previous blogs I have discussed the EU’s energy security and it is interesting to see Russia’s views on future energy supply. We note that it will decline but, at the same time, we see that our economic growth shall increase. At the moment we are not seeing increased growth with reduced energy consumption and the question is whether we will see it in future. My answer to the Russian Academy of Sciences must wait a while, but I hope to be able to find time for it during the summer.

(Swedish)
I går fick jag ett mail från Tatiana Mitrova, Head of Oil and Gas Department, Energy Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. Hon berättade att Ryssland nu hade släppt sin “Global and Russian Energy Outlook To 2040”, och att man i den hade gjort en detaljerad studie av den ryska energisektorn. Hon avslutade sitt mail med ”Your comments and feedback would be highly appreciated!”

Globala energisystem (GES) vid Uppsala universitet har studerat rysk oljeproduktion i ett examensarbete, rysk kolproduktion i en artikel som publicerades 2010 och rysk gas i en artikel som också publicerades 2010. Kol- och gas artikeln ingick i respektive Mikael Hööks och Bengt Söderberghs doktorsavhandlingar. Det kommer att bli mycket intressant att göra en genomgång och det är självklart att jag kommer att skriva en rapport om min analys. Under ett par timmar har jag bläddrat igenom den 173 sidor långa Energy Outlook to 2040 och här är några snabba noteringar.

Kinas kolproduktion

Att vår forskning finns med i den ryska analysen ser vi i bland annat tabell 2.2 som visar kolproduktionen i Kina. I vår analys från 2010 har vi att Peak Coal i Kina kommer att bli mellan 2020 och 2025 med en maximal produktion med 3.3 miljarder ton. I samarbete med forskare från Kina har GES gjort en mycket mer detaljeras studie presenterad 2013. Toppåret blev 2024 och topproduktionen 4.1 miljarder ton. Som ni ser är detta nu också Kinas officiella uppfattning.

Global GDP per region

I inledningen av rapporten finns det en detaljerad analys av den globala befolkningstillväxten och den globala och regionala ekonomiska tillväxten per person. Notera den kraftiga kinesiskt tillväxten men också den kraftiga ökningen i Ryssland. Globalt har man aldrig sett ekonomisk tillväxt utan ökad energianvändning och energianvändningen per person ökar i Kina och Ryssland. Vad det gäller USA och övriga OECD, inklusive EU, så förväntar man sig en kraftig tillväxt utan att energikonsumtionen per invånare ökar. Intressanta slutsatser som kräver mer detaljerad studie.

Global energy per person and per region

Global primary energy consumption

I figur A1 visar man hur energimixen förväntas förändra sig fram till 2040. Likt alla andra analyser så förväntas det bara bli ökningar inom alla energislag. Det finns ingen detaljerad redogörelse för hur man kommer fram till dessa värden men en diskussion om vilka delar av världen som kommer att ha en ökad energikonsumtion och dito produktion.

Oil production in Russia

För mig är analysen av den ryska produktionen intressantast så vi hoppar till slutet av rapporten. I figur 3.24 och det är intressant att notera att ett av världens ledande exportländer nu rapporterar att deras oljeproduktion förväntas nå ett maximum 2015. Det stämmer väl med den analys som vi gjorde 2007 och som är diskuterad i Peeking at Peak Oil. Vi sa att 2016 är det mest troliga året för maximal rysk oljeproduktion. Notera den kraftiga nedgången från de nuvarande oljefälten i Ryssland.

Table oil export

För oss i Sverige som importerar mer än 40% av vår olja från Ryssland är det extra intressant att studeras deras förväntade framtida export av olja. År 2010 exporterade man 248 millioner ton och redan 2015 ser vi en total nedgång till 240 millioner ton. Exporten till Europa minskar med hela 12%. År 2040 beräknar man att exporten bara är 187 millioner ton och jämfört med 2010 har exporten till Europa minskat från 182 millioner ton till 83 millioner ton vilket är en minskning med 54%. Samtidigt ökar exporten till Asia-Pacific. En anledning till detta är att den olja som markeras ”from new discovered” är från fält från asiatiska delen av Ryssland. Sin inhemska konsumtion måste man framförallt ta från gamla fält som också producerar olja till Europa. Jag tror inte att politiker i Europa är medvetna om detta hot mot den Europeiska energisäkerheten.

Russia pipeline system

Då man studerar det Ryska pipelinesystemet så ser man hur betydelsefull exporten från Saint Petersburg är. Sverige bör skaffa sig långsiktiga importkontrakt med Ryssland för att säkra vår oljeimport. Att tro att vi inte behöver någon bensin, flygbränsle och diesel i framtiden är inte realistiskt.

Gas production in Russia

I vår artikel från 2010 visade vi den Ruska nedgången av gasproduktion i existerande fält. Det är delar av denna gas som idag exporteras till EU. I figur 3.30 här nedan är produktionen uppdelad i olika regioner. Ny produktion är ”Far East” och ”Eastern Siberia” och den produktionen kommer inte att komma till EU. Tyumen ligger i sydvästra Sibirien och den gasen kommer att exporteras till Kina. Vad det gäller ”Northern seas” är det framförallt Stockman och Yamal är ett eget kapitel.

Gas production in Russia by region

LNG terminals

Vad man markerar är en kraftig utbyggnad av LNG terminaler och i figur 3.33 markerar man 5 nya jämte den som redan finns i Sakhalin. Det faktum att LNG ger en större frihet att välja exportland borde vara en tankeställare för politiker inom EU.

Vad det gäller export skriver man att exporten skall öka från 223 bcm år 2010 till 310 bcm år 2040 och man nämner att man par produktion som kan täcka EU:s behov. Exporten öster ut kommer att öka från nuvarande 6% av till 30% av exporten år 2040.

EU-28 primary energy consumption

I några blogginlägg har jag diskuterat EU:s energisäkerhet och det är intressant att se Rysslands åsikter om den framtida energiförsörjningen. Vi noterar at den skall minska men samtidigt såg vi att vår tillväxt skall öka. För tillfället ser vi inte en ökad tillväxt med minskad energikonsumtion, frågan är om vi kommer att göra det i framtiden. Mitt svar till den ryska vetenskapsakademin för vänta ett tag, men jag hoppas att det skall finnas tid under sommaren.

Posted in: Uncategorized